Massachusetts Estate Planning & Asset Protection Blog

Ten Estate Planning Success Tips

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Mon, Oct 20, 2014

Ten Estate Planning Success Tips

grandparentstrust 

 

Have You Planned for the Future Yet?

So you’re worried about the future, you want to make sure that not only your spouse, family and property is taken care of when you pass, but you want to make sure you’re taken care of while you’re still here. There is a lot of information out there to sort through, some of it is conflicting, and all of it is confusing. Here are some basic tips to help you get started: 

  1. Update your documents regularly. We honestly cannot stress this one enough. Keep your legal residence address, marital status, children and their potential guardians, and other documents updated. 
  1. Keep track of beneficiaries for all of your IRAs, qualified plans and insurance policies. Do you know who your beneficiaries are for these assets? If you don't, they may be going to someone you no longer wish to receive them, such as an ex-spouse. You can easily change the name of the person who will receive their benefits by filling out a form and submitting it. 
  1. Maximize the liquidity of your estate. Liquidity is defined as the ability to quickly turn assets into cash. Without sufficient cash to pay taxes, funeral, and other expenses, your family may have to sell illiquid assets - such as a family business or other property - at an inopportune time, and for less than full value. 
  1. Maintain an Appropriate Mix of Investment Risk. It's not the best idea to have too much money allocated to risk in stocks or mutual funds, as you age. Over time, more risky investments should be moved into safe and stable investments such as Annuities to ensure you are leaving an inheritance. 
  1. Name a dependable executor and/or trustee. Executors are called upon to collect assets, pay obligations, and distribute your assets. Your trustee must enforce all the provisions of any trusts you created. Choose someone who will have the knowledge, integrity and stamina to fulfil these obligations in the face of pressure from family members and lawsuits. 
  1. If you have minor children, consider naming one guardian for your minor children and another for the property you've left to support them, this will help ensure that your child will receive the full amount you’ve left them when they come of age. 
  1. Estate planning for your spouse or other sole survivor scenarios. If your net worth is high enough, your estate may be subject to taxes. A simple estate plan using trusts can save some individuals hundreds of thousands of dollars in estate taxes. 
  1. Make sure you are leaving the right assets to the right people with the right protections and provisions. If your child or other dependent has special needs or has been irresponsible with money in the past, you may not leave wish to leave them with the money to handle on their own. Make sure any minors receive much needed management assistance along with the cash. 
  1. Planning is even more difficult for business owners, who must plan for the succession and/or the buy-out of their business after they pass. Make sure any preparations that are needed for a smooth transition are taken care of. 
  2. Consult a professional. This may seem obvious, but we do have to say it. Estate Planning is a complex and difficult subject for most people to take care of on their own, and simple mistakes can cost you and your family tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

But Wait, There’s More!

Got all those taken care of? Well don’t relax just yet; there are still dozens of other questions you need to take care of before you’re done. Have you protected your assets from all unnecessary taxes? Have you established trusts that will be safe from predatory lawsuits? Are your documents up to date with the ongoing changes in laws, policies and eligibilities? Have you made sure to secure a portion of your assets in case you need nursing home care or are you planning to try and give everything away beforehand? These are things you need to take care of before your planning is truly complete.

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we provide a unique education and counseling process which includes our unique 19 Point Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Review to help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones, click here for more information. We provide clients with a unique approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click here for more information on  Estate Planning and Asset Protection

Tags: Estate Planning, probate, trusts, protection, Wills, Estate Planning Tip, 2014

Have You Received Your Flu Shot Yet?

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Mon, Oct 20, 2014

Have You Received Your Flu Shot Yet?
Vaccination

You Want To Give Me A What?

Yesterday I stopped by my doctor’s office to get my yearly flu shot. I was surprised when I was asked whether I wanted a “High-Dose” shot. This was something new to me, I had never heard of a “High-Dose” shot before and I didn’t know what the difference was, so like anything the doctor wants to give me, I made him explain just what a “High-Dose” shot is and why I needed it. Since I expect that many seniors are also unfamiliar with “High-Dose” shots, I thought I would post this brief article on the subject.

Warning: I am a lawyer, not a medical professional. This post is only for informational purposes and I strongly recommend speaking to your doctor before requesting any change in you medication. 

So What Did He Say?

My doctor told me that the “High-Dose” shot is simply a more powerful version of the same flu shot that I have been getting every year. When I asked for more detail he told me to look at the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the government’s health protection agency, to see what it says about whether seniors should be getting the high-dose shot.

Here is what the CDC says: “Fluzone High-Dose vaccine contains four times the amount of antigen (the part of the vaccine that prompts the body to make antibodies) contained in regular flu shots. The additional antigen is intended to create a stronger immune response (more antibodies) in the person getting the vaccine.”

The CDC then goes on to try to answer some of the questions older adults may have which I have re-posted below. 

Why is a higher dose vaccine available for adults 65 and older?

Human immune defenses become weaker with age, which places older people at greater risk of severe illness from influenza. Also, ageing decreases the body's ability to have a good immune response after getting influenza vaccine. A higher dose of antigen in the vaccine is supposed to give older people a better immune response, and therefore, better protection against flu. 

Does the higher dose vaccine produce a better immune response in adults 65 years and older?

Data from clinical trials comparing Fluzone to Fluzone High-Dose among persons aged 65 years or older indicate that a stronger immune response (i.e., higher antibody levels) occurs after vaccination with Fluzone High-Dose. Whether or not the improved immune response leads to greater protection has been the topic on ongoing research. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicated that the high-dose vaccine was 24.2% more effective in preventing flu in adults 65 years of age and older relative to a standard-dose vaccine. The confidence interval for this result was 9.7% to 36.5%). 

Is Fluzone High-Dose safe?

The safety profile of Fluzone High-Dose vaccine is similar to that of regular flu vaccines, although some adverse events (which are also reported after regular flu vaccines) were reported more frequently after vaccination with Fluzone High-Dose. The most common adverse events experienced during clinical studies were mild and temporary, and included pain, redness and swelling at the injection site, headache, muscle aches, fever and malaise. Most people had minimal or no adverse events after receiving the Fluzone High-Dose vaccine. 

Who can get this vaccine?

Fluzone High-Dose is approved for use in people 65 years of age and older. As with all flu vaccines, Fluzone High-Dose is not recommended for people who have had a severe reaction to the flu vaccine in the past

Does the CDC recommend one vaccine above another for people 65 and older?

The CDC and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have not expressed a preference for any flu vaccine indicated for people 65 and older. CDC recommends flu vaccination as the first and most important step in protecting against the flu.

Based on this information, I personally decided to get the high dose shot. It's covered by Medicare. 

I hope the information above helps you be better informed when you get your flu shot this year. As always we agree with the vast majority of medical professionals who think that an annual flu shot is a safe and smart thing to do. Once again though I must remind you I am not personally a medical professional and advise you to speak to your doctor before receiving any medication.

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we provide a unique education and counseling process which includes our unique 19 Point Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Review to help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones, click here for more information. We provide clients with a unique approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: 2014, Flu Shot, high-dose, doctor, fluzone

Things You Need To Know About Hospital Admissions and Long term care

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Tue, Jul 29, 2014

 

Medicade Estate Planning Asset Protection

 

The Bad News: The Three Midnight “admission” Stay Requirement Can Destroy Medicare Coverage for Rehab (the cost could be from $8,000 to 10,000 a month)

 

Alas, notwithstanding all the controversy about the Three Midnight Stay Rule (That you must be on “Admitted” status not on “Observational” status) to qualify for the subsequent Medicare coverage, we still do not see any relief.

 

There is legislation pending to change this so that people are very clear as to when they are on admission status versus observation status, the latter of which does not qualify towards the Three Midnight Stay required by Medicare for coverage in a subsequent rehabilitation center. This has surprised, shocked and disappointed a large number of seniors. Don’t let it happen to you!

 

The Good News: The Old “Improved Standard” for Medicare Coverage is out and the new “Maintain Standard” is in!

 

As a result of the recent court decision in Jimmo v. Sibelius that was decided in 2013, Medicare clarified that maintenance coverage under the skilled nursing. Home health, skilled therapy and outpatient therapy benefit does not depend on whether the patient can improve. Eligibility for Medicare depends solely on whether skilled care is required and whether the actual services are reasonable and necessary.

 

This means that you no longer need to demonstrate that you will be improving every day during treatment. With chronic diseases such as MS, Parkinson’s and other health matters, improvement may not actually be possible. However, healthcare providers humanely try to help patients maintain and sometimes this maintenance is dependent on their skilled care. Now, as decided in the class action lawsuit mentioned above, you will qualify for Medicare.

 

Clients and patients should be made aware that they may request a review for all Medicare claims for skilled care or therapy denied before January 13, 2011.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Estate Planning, Estate Planning, Elder Law, MassHealth, Estate Planning Tip, elder care, elder care journey, Massachusetts, Elder Law, Estate Planning Recommendations, Massachusettes, 2014

The Spend Down and Long Term Care Insurance

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Jul 25, 2014

long term care insurance, estate planning

 

For 20 years now, we’ve been guiding clients and their families on the spend down of assets before applying for Medicaid.  Successful applicants must spend down just about everything before getting Medicaid approval, including any life insurance policies that have cash surrender value.

For many seniors the cash surrender value of their policies is a fraction of the death benefit value, typically 10%.  Cashing in the policy for a few thousand dollars, in some instances, causes the loss of a death benefit of $50,000 or more.  Certainly, the insurance companies don’t mind.  Pay them years of premiums and then cancel the policy before they ever have to pay a claim.  Even where Medicaid isn’t yet a consideration, many seniors on fixed incomes let their policies lapse because they simply can’t afford them any longer.  Hundreds of millions of dollars in death benefits are never claimed.

When we come across these scenarios, where the “spread” between the cash surrender value and death benefit is large, we explore ways to keep the policy in force.  Sometimes children or other family members with the financial means to do it, can purchase the policies for the cash value.  The senior gets the cash which must then be spent down but the child now owns the policy and when the parent passes away the family will receive the death benefit.  The child must continue to pay the premiums, of course, but the policy is preserved.

But not every family has the financial ability to do that.  There is, however, another option for those families.  It’s something called a life settlement and  many state Medicaid divisions are encouraging their residents to pursue it.  Next time I will explain exactly what it is and how it works.

find the article here by Hauptman & Hauptman
 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Estate Planning, long term care, 2014, long term care insurance

My Bank Says I Need A Guardianship for My Parents

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Thu, Jun 26, 2014

Power of Attorney, Massachusetts, Banks

 

Jane presented to the bank the power of attorney (POA) we had prepared and her parents had signed in our office 2 years ago.  It was a general durable power of attorney, giving Jane the ability to do banking on her parent’s behalf as well as other actions she might need to take in the future, such as accessing retirement accounts, life insurance policies, and real estate.

We tell clients to anticipate problems.  Financial institutions prefer that their customers sign a POA on their form in their presence.  Why?  Because it is easier for them.  They don’t have to worry about whether the POA is valid, whether the agent has the right to access the account on the principal’s behalf.   The bank told Jane that her parents would need to come into the branch with Jane to acknowledge the POA or sign a new one.

That, however, was not possible because her parents have advanced dementia and other issues that prevent them from leaving their home often.  Her mother is no longer competent to sign or acknowledge anything.  When Jane told the bank manager this, the manager replied, “well then you’ll need to apply for guardianship to access her account.  We don’t accept outside powers of attorney”.

What happened to Jane is not uncommon.  The bank was categorically rejecting all POAs.   Jane was understandably upset.  “What’s the point of having a power of attorney if banks won’t honor it”, she asked.  I completely understood her frustration.  I also know that the bank is wrong and it’s policy is in direct violation of Massachusetts’s power of attorney statute.

Next time I’ll tell you how we resolved it.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: power of attorney, Estate Planning, guardianship, 2014

Hiring a Health Care Aide - Independent Contractor or Employee?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Tue, May 13, 2014

 

MassHealth, In Home Care, Massachusetts

It’s a conversation we have with most of our clients at some point when guiding them through what we call the elder care journey.  Dad wants to stay at home but needs assistance with some of what are known as the activities of daily living – eating, bathing, dressing, walking and toileting.

We recommend to our clients that they hire a home health agency for a variety of reasons which I have written about in previous blog posts.  That aide is going to be coming into Dad’s home.  The agency does background checks before hiring.  Proof of spend down for Medicaid isn’t an issue when hiring an agency.  The contract and payment to the agency is all that needs to be shown, unlike the cash payments that families often make when hiring an undocumented aide.

There is another concern we discuss with clients and their families, but which they then generally push aside, and that is the question whether the aide they hire is an employee or an independent contractor.

In many cases the line between the two is easy to draw.  For example, the contractor you hire to do work on your home is not your employee.  He is hired to do a specific job, controls the manner in which he does it and upon completion he is paid.  Similarly, most professionals such as doctors, lawyers and architects are paid the same way.

The question is more difficult to answer, however, when we consider someone who comes into your home regularly to perform a service.  For example, a landscaper who cuts your lawn or the person that comes to clean your home every week will generally be treated as an independent contractor.

What are the commonalities to an independent contractor?  If only the worker can control how the work is done, the worker provides his or her own tools and offers his or her services to the general public as an independent business, then it is clear that he is treated as an independent contractor.

The line becomes more blurred, however, when we consider the aide hired to provide care for Dad.  Does the aide work for more than one person at time?  Is the aide a live in?  Who controls the manner in which the work is performed?  And what laws might a family be concerned with if the aide is considered an employee?  We’ll discuss all that next time.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: MassHealth, Health Care, 2014, in-home care

What To Do When Medicaid Comes For You Part 2

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Apr 09, 2014

Medicaid, Masshealth, Estate Planning

Last time I was telling you about Noah’s problem with Medicaid.  After his Dad died he received a Medicaid estate recovery letter from the State of Massachusetts looking to recoup $150,000 in benefits.

He was not happy when I explained to him that under Medicaid rules they are owed that money.  When Noah purchased Dad’s house, he did not pay fair market value for it.  That’s because he reduced the purchase price by $300,000 to pay for repairs and upgrades that benefitted Noah, not Dad.  In essence, Dad made a transfer for less than fair value which is subject to a Medicaid penalty.

So, why then did Medicaid approve the application and pay for Dad’s care for 3 years?  Because the state never came back to check on whether the home was sold.  Remember I told you that Noah first put the home on the market to try to sell it so the State processed Dad’s application and approved it.  They just never checked backed to see the status of the sale until after Dad died.

It’s never easy telling someone they have a $150,000 bill to pay but Noah was actually financially much better off than had he sold the home for fair market value before applying for Medicaid.  If he sold the home and netted $300,000 for Dad before he applied for Medicaid, then that money would have been spent on Dad’s nursing home care at a rate more than double what the State was paying.  In approximately 2.5 years the money would have run out, at which time Noah would then have filed a Medicaid application.

Instead, he applied for Medicaid before the house sold.  Once Dad died Massachusetts came looking to be reimbursed but for only half of what Dad should have netted from the house sale, which means Noah can keep the rest.  He also received what is the equivalent of an interest free loan, since the State is not charging him interest on the money it paid out in benefits.

With all the improvements he made, Noah told me the home is now worth probably $600,000 or more.  If he doesn’t have the cash to pay the State, he can take a mortgage on the home.  And again, he is still $150,000 ahead.

I knew it would take time for it to sink in but I told Noah he was lucky.  What it did end up to be the best move from a Medicaid standpoint.  He just didn’t know it at the time.  Noah’s story is a cautionary tale.  He went through the Medicaid system blindly and, albeit, with a repayment of $150,000 to Medicaid, it turned out OK.  It certainly could have been a lot worse.

Keep in mind that each situation is different.   What was the right move for Noah and his Dad may not be the right one for the next person.  Each situation has its unique set of facts and circumstances and is why I always tell people there is too much at stake to try this on your own.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Medicaid, MassHealth, Massachusetts, Medicaid penalties, 2014

What To Do When Medicaid Comes For You

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Apr 04, 2014

Medicaid, estate planning

Noah called us because he received a letter from Medicaid looking for money.  Dad had been on Medicaid for 3 years before he passed away.  Massachusetts was looking to recoup benefits it paid out on Dad’s behalf to the tune of approximately $150,000.

                Noah received what is called an estate recovery letter.  The State of Massachusetts looks to recover as much of its money as it can from the estates of Medicaid recipients when they die.  “But, why would there be anything left when Dad died,” you might ask, since he had to spend down to less than $2000 in assets before qualifying in the first place.  Good question.

Well, you see, the problem goes back about 4 years.  Noah told me that his dad was living in his home until his health declined to the point where he needed to be placed in a nursing home.  Since Dad had only the house to his name and no other assets, Noah paid some of Dad’s care costs before and after he moved to the nursing home, about $100,000 total.  He then put the house up for sale and applied for Medicaid.

                Massachusetts Medicaid will approve the application while you are trying to sell the home – as long as all the other Medicaid requirements are met.  And that is just what happened in the case of Noah’s dad.  But then the story takes a bit of a twist.

                After some time on the market without an offer, Noah decided to buy the home himself.   It needed a lot of work and upgrades so he and his wife and kids could move in.  He purchased the home for $400,000 and spent $300,000 in repairs and upgrades.  At the closing he reimbursed to himself the $100,000 he spent on Dad’s care from his own funds.  But, he also reduced the purchase price by $300,000.  In other words, Dad actually paid the costs of the repairs and upgrades and received no cash in the transaction.

                That was the root of the problem with Medicaid.  Dad actually made a gift of equity in the home to Noah, which would of course be subject to a Medicaid penalty.  But, why did Dad remain on Medicaid for 3 years?  Didn’t that mean everything was still OK? And how much does Noah actually have to pay back?  We will cover that next time.

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Estate Planning, Medicaid, MassHealth, Medicaid penalties, 2014

Healthy Eating Impacts Lifestyle|Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Mon, Mar 31, 2014

Lifestyle, Healthy Eating

 

I tell my clients that, as you age, your food choices become more important, because they can keep you younger – and healthier – longer.

Eating a well-planned, balanced diet may reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, bone loss, cancer, and anemia. If you already have one of these diseases, eating well may help you better manage it. And it can also help reduce high blood pressure and cholesterol.

 

 

The foods you put into your mouth are the fuel that powers not only your body, but also your brain health. And they help you control – or lose control of – your weight. Extra weight, of course, increases your risk for diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, as well as joint problems.

 

 

 

Choosing mostly nutrient-dense foods that are light in calories will give you the energy you need, while enhancing your digestion, too.

We all have friends that have started “diets” and not stuck to them. Eating well has nothing to do with a “diet.” It’s part of an everyday healthy lifestyle. That’s why it’s important to start with small steps such as ditch the salt shaker. It’s a killer – literally!

And add more seafood, fruits, whole-grain bread, and vegetables to your grocery cart.

Always check with your doctor or dietician first if you have a specific medical condition.

And, remember: It’s not about a diet. It’s about a lifestyle!

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 

                                    Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

 


Tags: massachusetts estate planning strategies, Health Care, Massachusetts, health, medical, 2014, Healthy Eating, balanced diet, lifestyle

Slowing the Aging Process If You're A Senior|Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Feb 26, 2014

 Slowing down the aging process

You can’t stop your body from aging.

But you can slow the process down. One way to do it is by eating a nutritious variety of foods that stimulate both physical and mental well-being, and that supply you with weapons to make the good fight against Father Time.

Here are some tips…

 

 

  • Salt’s a killer. Eating less will help prevent water retention and high blood pressure. Look for the “low sodium” label. And season your food with garlic, herbs, and spices instead.
  • You can enjoy some “good” fats. Olive oil, avocados, salmon, walnuts, flaxseed, and other monounsaturated fats help prevent heart disease.
  • FIBER! As you get older, it becomes more important. It helps you avoid constipation, and lowers your chances of chronic illness. Among other foods, it’s found in raw fruits and vegetables, whole-grains, and legumes.
  • Avoid “bad” carbs such as white flour, refined sugar, and white rice, which are stripped of their bran, fiber, and nutrients. Bad carbs cause spikes in blood sugar, while complex carbs such as whole grains, beans, fruits, and vegetables help stabilize it.
  • Food companies do their best to camouflage sugar in their products. They’ll call it corn syrup, molasses, brown rice syrup, cane juice, fructose, sucrose, dextrose, or maltose. But it’s still sugar!  
  • Steam or sauté your vegetables in olive oil. (Boiling drains nutrients.)
  • Put five colors on your plate. Fruits and vegetables rich in color are generally rich in nutrients, too.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops. Call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Click below to download your free copy of 7 Strategies to Protect Yourself Against Obamacare, Higher Taxes, Increasing Nursing Home Costs, and Other Government Changes.

estate planning, asset protection, Obamacare 

 Click here

 

 

Tags: massachusetts estate planning strategies, Estate Planning, Elder Law, family, Massachusetts, care, lawyer, Attorney, health, family, 2014, Dennis Sullivan, Healthy Eating, balanced diet

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