Massachusetts Estate Planning & Asset Protection Blog

Understanding Long-Term Care Costs and Alzheimer's I Massachusetts Alzheimer's Attorney

Posted by Massachusetts Alzheimer's Attorney Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Mar 18, 2016

Alzheimer's and Long Term Care

alzheimers_walk.jpg

Alzheimer's is growing at an alarming rate. Alzheimer's increased by 46.1% as a cause of death between 2000 and 2006, while causes of death from prostate cancer, breast cancer, heart disease and HIV all declined during that same time period.

The 2015 Alzheimer's Association annual report titled, “Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures” explores different types of dementia, causes and risk factors, and the cost involved in providing health care, among other areas. This report contains some eye-opening statistics:

  • An estimated 5.3 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer's disease. This figure includes 5.1 million people aged 65 and older and 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have early-onset Alzheimer's.
  • One in nine people age 65 and older (11 percent) has Alzheimer’s disease.
  • About one-third of people age 85 and older have Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Eighty-one percent of people who have Alzheimer’s disease are age 75 or older. The number of people aged 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease is estimated to reach 7.7 million in 2030 - more than a 50% increase from the 5.1 million aged 65 and older currently affected.
  • Every 67 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s. Thus, approximately 473,000 people age 65 or older developed Alzheimer’s disease in the United States in 2015.
  • By 2050, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with Alzheimer's is projected to number between 11 million and 16 million - unless medical breakthroughs identify ways to prevent or more effectively treat the disease.

Currently long-term care costs for dementia and Alzheimer's patients are about 80% higher than any other long-term care need. This is because dementia and Alzheimer's patients require more “caregiving” in terms of help with basic daily functions. Things that many of us take for granted to be able to do for ourselves, even when we are sick, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, and eating, are all activities many dementia patients require assistance with as the disease progresses. In addition, dementia patients often need someone with them just to protect them from themselves. Many dementia patients wander or harm themselves. Therefore, constant oversight of them is necessary.

Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, or any other type of dementia. There are treatments that may help slow the progression of the disease. There are also theories related to diet that may help prevention or stave off the development of dementia. However, there are no surefire ways to beat this disease right now. Advocating for the recognition of the costs associated with the disease as well as the heartbreaking effect on friends and family of the patient, is the best way to raise awareness to support the finding of a cure and prevention of dementia. We can all look forward to a day that this disease is a thing of the past because a cure, and/or prevention, has been found.

Click here to get a FREE copy of our book "The Senior and Boomer's Guide to Health care Reform and Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty"

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we provide a unique education and counseling process which includes our original 19 Point Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Review to help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life savings, and legacy for their loved ones. Attend a free workshop to discover where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as you implement plans for a protected future.

You may register now for a free educational workshop - call 800-964-4295 or click the button below, to register and learn more about what youcan do to protect your spouse, your home, and your life savings.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: long term care, Elder Law, seniors, elder care, long term care insurance, dementia, alzheimers, boomers, care costs, alzheimers care

Why Retitling Assets to Your Spouse to Qualify for Medicaid May Not Work

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Mon, Jan 26, 2015

Why Retitling Assets to Your Spouse to Qualify for Medicaid May Not Work | Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney
 

 nursing-home-brochure

 

It’s something we have written about in past blog posts but just last week we received a call from Angela on this exact issue.  Her husband, Peter, has Alzheimer’s and is receiving care at home from a visiting nurse.  She is concerned that as his condition worsens, it won’t be long before he needs to go to a nursing home for care.  At around $160,000 a year she doesn’t have sufficient income to pay that kind of expense.

A few years ago Angela met with her attorney about planning for the possibility of needing Medicaid for Peter.  She wanted to insure that her primary residence and vacation home would be protected, and that they would not need to be sold and spent down for care.  Her attorney told her not to worry, “We’ll just transfer Peter’s interest in the homes over to you.”  So that’s what they did. 

 “Unfortunately”, we told Angela, “that is not going to protect the vacation home.” That’s because under Medicaid’s rules, Angela can keep their primary residence, however all other assets, including the vacation home, are considered “countable” assets.  Unfortunately, Angela is entitled to keep only up to a maximum of $119,220 (the limit in 2015) of the “countable assets”. Everything else may be required to be spent on Peter’s nursing home care. 

It’s a common mistake I still see people make all the time.  You can’t simply shift everything over to the healthy spouse in order to get the ill spouse’s assets under the $2,000 limit to qualify for Medicaid.  So, where does that leave Angela?  Next week I’ll share that with you.

 

For Furhter reading, look at our book The Seniors and Boomer's Guide to Health Care Reform and Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty where we cover topics like this and help you avoid many of the common pitfalls that occur during estate planning.

For more on the mistakes and oversights that can affect people and their families, take a look at our new book: The 10 Biggest Estate Planning and Asset Protection Mistakes People Make and How to Avoid Them! 2nd edition, now including the special bonus chapter, The Biggest Long Term Care Planning Oversights and Opportunities for Long Term Care

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we provide a unique education and counseling process which includes our unique 19 Point Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Review to help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones, click here for more information. We provide clients with a unique approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

 

Tags: Nursing Home Costs, asset protection, transfer of assets, alzheimers

Can Your Will Protect You When You Don't Die?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Thu, Aug 07, 2014

 

What Happens When You Don’t Die?

medicare, medicaid, wills, spouse

 

Is your “I love you” will capable of protecting you or your spouse from long-term care costs?

You know the kinds of wills we’re talking about: The husband leaves everything to the wife, the wife leaves everything to the husband and after they both die, everything goes to the kids. This works well in situations where the spouses are healthy one day and are deceased the next. 

However, as most of us know, life usually doesn’t work that way very often. Research indicates that nearly 70% of individuals over 65 will require some kind of long-term care in their lifetimes.

Thus, many spouses worry that if they predecease an ill spouse who is currently in a nursing home or will require long-term care at some point in the near future, there will be insufficient funds available to provide for their institutionalized spouses’ needs. This is an especially relevant concern for expenses that are not covered under Medicaid such as: care managers, private nurses, single rooms, as well as certain therapies and drugs.

Another concern is that the availability of funds from “I love you” wills and trusts will disqualify the surviving ill spouse from eligibility for Medicare benefits. As you know from prior articles, Medicare (MassHealth in Massachusetts) is the only long-term-care governmental program in the United States and does not cover long-term custodial care.

To solve this problem many of our clients rely on a “testamentary trust”. This is a trust built into the will of each spouse. For many estate planners, this is counterintuitive because much of the estate planning occurs within the context of a revocable living trust. In order to preserve access to Medicaid eligibility without requiring that the surviving spouse spend down the assets and lose the chance to maintain a “rainy day fund”, creating a testamentary trust in the will of the pre-deceasing spouse is essential.

What this means is that around age 55, you have to completely revise your wills and trusts to accommodate a different paradigm of thought. The thinking process is no longer “What happens when I die?” Now the question becomes “What happens if I don’t die and live a long time with expensive long-term care?”

The new paradigm requires a new estate plan. If you consider yourself middle-class (meaning that your net worth will be significantly impacted by the cost of long-term care for you and/or your spouse) and are over age 55, we suggest that you revise and update your estate plan to reflect your current and future needs as soon as possible.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: will, living will, Estate Planning, Estate Planning, Alzheimer's Disease, Elder Law, asset protection, long term care, Medicaid, in-home care, Health Care, estate reduction, estate, elder care journey, hospice, Alzheimers Disease, medicaid qualification, Wills, assets, Medicaid penalties, alzheimer's activities, in home, incapacity, Elder Law, Attorney, myths, Alzheimer's, alzheimers, financial, Attorney, income, Alzheimer's, federal, health, surviving spouse, in-home care, long term care insurance

Dealing with Financial and Emotional Costs of Dementia

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Jun 11, 2014

Helping Families Deal With the Financial and Emotional Costs of Dementia 

 Estate Planning, Alzheimers, Hardships, Dementia, Elderly, Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Homes, Financial Protection, Writing a will, Asset Protection,

Last month was National Elder Law Month A time for us to help educate the public about Elder Law and how we can help seniors and their families by providing solutions to the unique issues that come with aging.  Today we will discuss a debilitating condition that many Americans eventually face as they age:  dementia.  First, we will describe what dementia is and what it isn’t.  Then we will turn our focus to its costs to the individual, the family and our nation.  Statistics show that Massachuestts costs range from $13,800 - $16,000 per month for a Nursing Home, $5,400 - $7,500 per month for assisted living, and $15 - $32 an hour for in-home care. We are specially situated to help find solutions to many of the problems this condition brings with it.  While we can’t stop dementia, we can help protect those in its clutches while the medical world continues to seek prevention, treatment and reversal of the condition.

            Dementia Defined  

The Alzheimer’s Association defines dementia as, “a general term for a decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life. Memory loss is an example. Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia.” 

 

Dementia is not actually a specified disease.  It describes, instead, a general decline in memory or other thinking skills and is identified through a variety of symptoms.  Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases.  In order to be characterized as dementia, at least two of the following mental functions must be significantly impaired:  visual perception; reasoning and judgment; memory; communication and language; or ability to focus and pay attention.  Dementia is not a normal part of aging as the terms “senility" or "senile dementia” infer. 

If a loved one is having trouble with any two or more of these mental functions, it’s a good idea to get it checked by a doctor.  Dementia is progressive and typically takes over the mental functions over time.  In this way, it provides the individual and the family with time to plan for its disastrous affects. [1]

 

Cost to the Individual

The cost to the individual with dementia is difficult to quantify.  Because dementia is a progressive condition and one where aging is the greatest risk factor, it is logical that at the beginning and younger stages of dementia, the cost to the individual is minimal.  As dementia progresses, so does the need for assistance with daily activities. 

This assistance often comes in the form of meal preparation, help with grooming and hygiene, transportation assistance, as well as help with many other daily activities.  Dementia patients can become so mentally challenged that they may place themselves in dangerous situations, such as roaming neighborhoods and getting lost.

  While the individual affected by dementia may need only a few hours of help per week at the beginning of symptoms showing, soon they may need around the clock supervision, not only for assistance with daily activities, but to protect them from themselves.  The individual’s costs will include medical expenses as well as paying a caretaker. 

Caretaking for one with dementia varies depending on the quantity of care required.  Statistics show that Massachuestts costs range from $13,800 - $16,000 per month for a Nursing Home; $5,400 - $7,500 per month for assisted living; and $15 - $32 an hour for in-home care. 

 

Cost to the Family

Where the individual with dementia is fortunate enough to have family nearby, the family will often step up to assist the ill loved one with their daily activities.  Again, the process can be gradual and before the helpful family member realizes it, they may find themselves missing work and, finally, quitting their job altogether in order to give proper care to the dementia patient.  Obviously, the cost to the family includes the loss of income from this family member’s job. 

The less recognizable cost to the family, however, is the emotional strain that is placed on the family member caretaker.  In order to save the family money, many family members will work nearly twenty-four hours, seven days per week.  The ramifications are physical, mental and emotional health problems to the caretaker.  The medical costs and possible future psychological costs to the caretaker, then, must be considered.

 

            It is important that family members: take a step back from the situation and assess this cost.  Providing a caretaker with time off every day, week and year is a must to ensure the caretaker’s health.  The caretaker must have appropriate support in order to keep caring for the loved one.


Cost to the Nation

As a nation we have begun to recognize the devastation that dementia has caused and will continue to cause.  Organizations such as the Alzheimer’s Association have been effective in lobbying for monies to be put towards the research of dementia treatment, prevention and reversal.  The cost of dementia to our nation has been a great motivator for politicians to fund such research.


A study conducted by RAND Corporation in 2013, estimated the national cost of dementia to be between $159 billion to $215 billion (including an estimate for the monetary value of informal care provided).[2]  The majority of the costs associated with dementia are for institutional and home-based long-term care and not medical services. 

Medicare and Medicaid pay for some of this cost, which amounts to a taxpayer burden.  According to the Alzheimer’s Association March 2013 Fact Sheet, in 2013 it is estimated that Medicare and Medicaid paid approximately $142 billion in caring for those with Alzheimer’s or other type of dementia.[3]

           

It is clearly in the best interest of the nation’s economy to continue research on prevention, treatment and reversal of dementia.

 

            Conclusion

 The costs of dementia can be devastating to the affected individual, their family and the nation.  While scientists continue to search for solutions to the debilitating condition, the families affected with it must face its challenges.  It is recommended that those families seek emotional support by way of a therapist or support group. In our recent book, “Senior and Boomer’s Guide to Health Care Reform and Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty” we provided helpful information how families can obtain quality care and protect a loved one with Alzheimer’s.  In addition, seeking out an Elder Law attorney can benefit the affected individual and family members in several ways.  We can also ensure that the family’s assets are being used in the most efficient manner considering other available resources and the family’s individual goals. 

 

Becoming educated and involved in planning for the challenges ahead is one of the MOST important steps a family facing the impact of dementia will take.  If you or someone you know is affected by dementia, we can help and we welcome the opportunity to do so.  To attend a workshop call 800-964-4295 or register online at DSullivan.com. For more information regarding our books, free workshops, and a DVD entitled,

“Helping People and Their Families on the Alzheimer’s Journey,”

Call our office at 781-237-2815.

 

 Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

[1] http://www.alz.org/what-is-dementia.asp
[2] http://www.rand.org/news/press/2013/04/03.hml
[3] http://act.alz.org/site/DocServer/2012_Costs_Fact_Sheet_version_2.pdf?docID=7161 
 

Tags: Estate Planning, Alzheimer's Disease, MassHealth, dementia, VA benefits, alzheimers, caretaker

Early Signs That You May Be Getting Alzheimer's | Massachusetts Alzheimer's Attorney

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Mon, Jan 13, 2014

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Alzheimer's: Just hearing the word strikes fear into anyone over 50.

 The statistics are chilling. Already, more than five million Americans have Alzheimer's. And by the time the last Baby Boomer passes away, that figure will be over ten million.

Prior to the past few decades, it was simply called dementia. It wasn't until recent years that Alzheimer's became classified as a disease in itself...and as just one of a number of forms of dementia.

Most of us tend to think of memory loss as the chief distinguishing characteristic of Alzheimer's. And, realistically, it probably is. But it's often not the first way in which Alzheimer's manifests itself. In fact, there are a number of signs - prior to any noticeable memory loss - which could indicate the onset of this disease.

Unfortunately, most of us (and, often, even doctors) miss these early signs - because we're too focused on memory loss as the most significant indicator.

 In 2011, research in Spain indicated that more than a third of adults who go on to develop early-onset Alzheimer's (before age 65) display a number of other symptoms, before memory loss becomes obvious. Interestingly, they're also the same symptoms that often appear first in patients who develop the disease after 65.

 In Part 2, we'll give you the list of early symptoms which could possibly indicate the onset of Alzheimer's.

 With all this talk about Alzheimer's and dementia, it's wise to remember that estate planning isn't something you do after you become sick. It's something to do before you ever get sick!

 

We can help. We've been planning Massachusetts families' estates for the past 25 years.

 

We can help your family, too. We're just a phone call away.

To gain free online access to our Senior and Boomers Guide to Healthcare Reform and Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty, which contains care tips as well as other useful information , please Click the link here:

Seniors and Boomers Guide 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center of Dennis Sullivan & Associates, we help people and their families concerned with losing their homes and life savings to increasing medical and nursing home costs, taxes and the costs and time delays of probate. We also protect clients from losing control of their own health and financial decisions.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops to learn more about our process and what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy. To register for a seat at an upcoming workshop call (800) 964-4295 (24/7) or register online at www.SeniorWorkshop.com

Tags: Alzheimer's Disease, Alzheimers Disease, alzheimer's activities, Alzheimer's, alzheimers, Nursing Home, 2014

Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney | Is Art Therapy The Answer for Dementia?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Thu, Nov 29, 2012

Medications can’t stop the disease’s inexorable damage to the mind, and stress and agitation often remain challenging despite drug treatment. But a growing number of Alzheimer’s institutions and caregivers are realizing that a musical walk down memory lane — a dance class, storytelling session, art project, or museum tour — can do more than offer pleasant diversions. They can improve a number of disease symptoms as well as quality of life.Alzheimer's, art, therapy

The basic idea is to use art to engage and connect with people with dementia. No matter how many memories they’ve lost, an essential piece of who they always were still remains.

Even people who were not artistic or music lovers in their youth can be inspired by the sound of a song they heard on their first date, or by a painting that evokes an emotion. Writers and poets also see their art as a way to reach people, regardless of age or prognosis.

One of the key benefits of doing or appreciating art is that it challenges people who are usually doted on.When you are cared for, you lose your sense of who you are. Everybody with dementia has a lot going for them. They can experience, they can be present, and they can develop.

Robert Stern, a professor of neurology and neurosurgery at Boston University, said a growing body of research is confirming the anecdotal evidence that the arts can improve quality of life, reduce stress, and allow the person to better connect to the world. Recent research suggests music can boost recall of personal memories.

Whether it be fine arts, music, listening to music, going to museums. All those things do not have an impact on the disease per se. What they do most likely is they get through to the person with Alzheimer’s by exploiting the areas of the brain which are least impaired. Anything that can touch the patient through that network of brain areas can have a profound impact.

Medications such as cholinesterase inhibitors may be able to slow some of the memory loss of Alzheimer’s and allow people to live independently longer. But all of the efforts to develop drugs to reverse memory loss and the behavioral changes of Alzheimer’s have failed so far. Researchers think that’s because the damage of Alzheimer’s begins years, if not decades before symptoms become obvious. They are now testing drugs in people likely to develop the disease, to see if they are more effective.

Instead of just warehousing dementia patients until more effective medications are discovered or patients die, our present challenge is to provide people with a life worth living while they’re alive.

Using music and art and movements that don’t rely on verbal skills allows people to succeed. The primary language is emotion with this disease.

To gain free online access to the Complete Alzheimer's Resource Kit, which contains care tips as well as other useful information on Alzheimer’s disease, please visit www.BostonMemoryLawyer.com.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Elder Law, dementia, caregiver, Attorney, Alzheimer's, alzheimers, Alzheimers Disease. Massachusetts, art, therapy, music, cargiver

Massachusetts Alzheimer's Attorney | Caring for Your Loved One With Alzheimer's

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Oct 26, 2012

I'm The Only Family Member Doing Caregiving. How Do I Deal With That... And With Them?

If you think the Hatfields and McCoys went at it, you should see what happens in some families when a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer's or dementia. It can make that "other" feud seem like child's play!
caregiver, Alzheimer's, attorney
Additionally, it can give rise to tremendous resentment on the part of those who do the care-giving for those who don't.

When this happens, there's only one thing to do: Recognize that there's absolutely nothing you can do. And - even harder - let it go!

You have enough to handle. Any additional family matters will only weigh you down even more. Sometimes, family members may be afraid to see their loved one in such a state...or they may be in denial. But that's their problem. You can only do what's necessary to take care of yourself.

Care-giving is the toughest job in the world. And it can get even the strongest person down. So your personal priority should be to seek help - from people who can give it to you, rather than those who can't. Some people seek professional counseling. Others join support groups, where you'll quickly learn that you're hardly "the only person" who knows what you're going through. And, if your family can't be there for you, maybe a good friend can.

You may want to keep your family in the loop, about the condition, and how your loved one is doing. But don't harbor false expectations. For the most part, nothing you do or say to your family is going to motivate them to help, if they're not already motivated.

Even if they can't help, though...we can!

To gain free online access to the Complete Alzheimer's Resource Kit, which contains care tips as well as other useful information on Alzheimer’s disease, please visit www.BostonMemoryLawyer.com

alzheimer's, caregiver, attorney, Massachusetts

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Tags: dementia, Alzheimers Disease, Massachusetts, caregiver, care, Attorney, Alzheimer's, alzheimers

Massachusetts Alzheimer's Attorney | Can People With Alzheimer's Sometimes Seem Like Their Old Selves?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Oct 19, 2012

 

Can people with Alzheimer's sometimes seem like their old selves?

 

Simply put, yes! And, for the caregiver, it can be puzzling as heck!

 

One day, your loved one seems to be slipping away faster than ever. And the next, he's as lucid and as funny and as even-tempered as he was in the old days.

 Massachusetts, Elder Law, attorney, alzheimer's

Just like you and I, people with Alzheimer's or Dementia have good and bad days. On their good days, they'll be outgoing, lucid, and fully able to express their needs and their wants. They recognize people, and remember things they might not have known the day before. When this happens, the caregiver may fall victim to a false sense of hope.

 

Unfortunately, though, the illusion doesn't last very long. Within days - or the next day - you're loved one is "out of it," snappy, angry, and withdrawn into her own little world. And the hope you had nurtured just a day or two before is smashed against the wall of reality.

 

When your loved one goes through changes like this, you'll probably find yourself on an emotional roller-coaster.

 

That's why it's important to savor the good days! They'll eventually become fewer and far between... which is why you should squeeze every second of joy possible from them.

 

Caregivers must endure a grieving process. When they see temporary moments of hope, they tend to fantasize that those temporary moments might become permanent. But fantasies, of course, don't last. However, the memories you can make in those rare times when your loved one is her old self can last forever. And they can help pull you through the bad days.

 

When you're a caregiver to someone with Alzheimer's or Dementia, your mind is bombarded - constantly - with questions. But we can help.

To gain free online access to the Complete Alzheimer's Resource Kit, which contains care tips as well as other useful information on Alzheimer’s disease, please visit www.BostonMemoryLawyer.com

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: dementia, Massachusetts, caregiver, Attorney, Alzheimer's, alzheimers

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