Massachusetts Estate Planning & Asset Protection Blog

The High Cost of Seniors Living Longer

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Sep 05, 2014

 

The Cost of Living Longer | Massachusetts Eldercare Attorney

 

 planning, estate, eldercare

 

A Pachyderm of Problems

Every day, we see clients for whom long-term care is the elephant in the room. They feel they can’t afford the costs, but they also feel they can’t afford not to have it either. So their solution is to pretend they don’t see the elephant and try to ignore the problem until it goes away on its own. This unfortunately often leads to our metaphorical elephant trampling their life savings and any future inheritance they are trying to leave behind. The older you are, the more expensive a long-term care policy gets and if you get sick before you have long-term care protection in place, it’s too late. Insurance companies are looking out for their bottom line, and an already ill senior will scare them off.

The costs for these policies are rising faster than inflation too. Therein lies the conundrum for Boomers and seniors: They’re living longer than their parents did but that means they need more money to make it through “old age”. Finding long-term care is a tough and complicated process. You’ll need to find a place that cares for people with your (or your loved one’s) circumstances. You need to find a place with the right facilities and staff, a place that leaves you with a good, safe feeling. And you have to be able to afford it too. This is not any sort of one-size-fits-all situation. Everyone has their own specific services and conditions that they or their loved ones will need met. Remember, what we call “long-term care” is a broad category, with options ranging from live-in facilities to your own home.

Lurking Complications With Long Term Care

The greatest threat to the financial security of Boomers and seniors is the cost of long-term care (and Obamacare will not assist with this). Assisted-living facilities are now climbing toward the $7,500-a-month mark. Many have started bundling more services together, rather than charging for each individually. Bundling might be a good idea from the nursing home’s perspective, but just like pre-packaged cable TV you will wind up paying for a lot of services you don’t need and don’t want. A private room at a nursing home will range from $500 - $600 a day.

The cost of home healthcare is rising, too. Some people choose independent-living apartments. These facilities typically don’t require lump-sum payments, and residents can contract with home health-services independently. Medicaid may be there for those who qualify but if you ever want to learn the true meaning of “jumping through hoops” just try qualifying! The best thing, of course, is long-term care insurance, but that’s getting more expensive too as companies raise their rates while cutting back on their coverage. In addition, this insurance is getting more complicated, now encompassing aspects such as protection of the surviving spouse, caregiver issues, scams/ID theft, and making sure you have an advocate to fight for your rights in a system that’s slanted against you.

In short, we’re living longer, and unlike previous generations, people are generally not living with or even near their children. Seniors are going to need more money for this longer life and for any unforeseen medical problems that may arise.

A Magic Trick No One Wants to See

Do you know the fastest way for a Boomer or senior couple to become an impoverished Boomer or senior couple is? Simple, one of them just needs to become ill before they get long-term care insurance. We see it every day, people who’ve worked hard and saved money all their lives are forced to see it wash away in a flood of medical bills as they age. It is truly heart-breaking, because, if you’ve managed to squirrel some money away, you could probably have afforded long-term care. 

The Downside to Living Longer

Our life expectancies are going up these days and so is the cost of healthcare, the distance seniors are living from their children and families, and the financial pressures on Medicare and Medicaid. The new Affordable Care Act, in fact, stipulates $500 billion in Medicare cuts over the next decade! Where do you turn if you or your spouse gets ill? Home health care? Adult day-care? Assisted-living? A nursing facility? Respite-care services, which allow the caregiver to drop off the senior for a limited period? Who’s going to pay for it? And for how long?  These are the questions to ask now, while you still have time to plan. If you haven’t purchased long-term care before you or your spouse become ill…forget about it. No one will insure you once you’re sick! If this happens to you, you’re going to be out of time, out of options, and very quickly out of money. And if you’ve planned to leave something for your heirs, there may be nothing left to leave to them other than a pile of bills. 

 

It’s an old (but true) cliché: those who fail to plan, are planning to fail. When it comes to healthcare expenses as you age, you fail to plan at the risk of yourself and those you love.  

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we provide a unique education and counseling process which includes our unique 19 Point Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Review to help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones, click here for more information. We provide clients with a unique approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop 

 

Tags: living will, Estate Planning, Estate Planning, asset protection, Massacusetts Estate Tax, long term care, life insurance, Medicaid, MassHealth, in-home care, marriage, Estate Planning Tip, seniors, assisted living, life-care plan, hospice, Massachusetts, assets, in home, incapacity, asset, home, surviving spouse, Estate Planning Recommendations, in-home care, long term care insurance, Inheritance

For Seniors Who Are Betting on Getting to 80

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Thu, Aug 28, 2014

Betting on Getting to 80 | Massachusetts Elder Care Attorney

 

outliving, eldercare, savings, estate, nursing home 

For Those Who Are Concerned About Outliving Their Money

According to research for our book The Seniors and Boomers Guide to Health Care Reform and Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty, outliving one’s life savings is a top concern for many people. One possible solution to this is what the US Treasury is pushing many baby boomers to do: start writing checks to their insurance companies for products that won’t be a financial benefit for them until they’re 80. The Treasuries new rules on annuities known as longevity insurance could allow millions of Americans fresh options for their retirement accounts and 401(k) plans. This is according to Bloomberg Personal Finance.

The challenge: convincing savers to choose that option. The annuities thrill retirement experts and policy makers who see them as a way to ensure workers don’t end up impoverished in old age. Just about everyone else ignores the products, which make up less than 1 percent of all annuity sales.

It can be a great investment too. With $125,000, a 60-year-old man can buy a policy from New York Life that guarantees an income of almost $45,000 a year starting at age 80. The same $125,000 in a regular retirement account would need to grow at the unlikely rate of 11 percent a year from age 60 to 80 to provide that income, assuming 4 percent is withdrawn annually after age 80.

Planning for the Future

Since women live longer than men, their longevity policies are more expensive, and more valuable. Millions of widows in their 80s and 90s end up living on Social Security alone. A 60-year-old woman who puts $125,000 into one of these annuities could get an annual payout of $35,268. For women with a husband and no children, a longevity benefit is a comforting buffer against long-term care costs.

Dollars in longevity policies go farther for those who buy earlier than 60 or start the benefit later than 80. If the insurance becomes common in retirement plans, the cost of policies should fall. To maximize her payout, Carson decided against buying inflation protection and a provision that refunds all the money she put in if she dies early.

Indeed, the oft-repeated big risk with longevity insurance is that buyers could die before they collect. But that chance is what allows the policies to be so lucrative for the long-lived. Those who die early help pay for those who live into their 90s and later. And even if you die at 75, the guarantee of income at 80 means you can tap the rest of your nest egg earlier without worrying so much about running out of money.

How It Works

For longevity insurance to catch on, it needs to gain a foothold in retirement plans. The Treasury rules let workers devote as much as 25 percent of their 401(k) to the products, up to $125,000. That doesn't mean employers will offer the option or that workers will choose it though.

Employers face legal liability for their retirement plan options, making them cautious about relatively unproven products. Insurance companies may need to come up with new kinds of longevity annuities that are more transparent and are geared more towards women since they tend to live longer.

Adding to the resistance is a widespread assumption that Americans don't want to lock up their cash in insurance products. They'd rather get big eventual lump sum payouts, even if they have no idea how to turn that into an income that will support them in their old age.

What the Experts Think

If longevity insurance takes off, it will be a real victory for the experts who have been striving to change that mindset. This may also provide a solution for many boomers and seniors for whom outliving their life savings is a major concern. For more information about these and other concerns see the report from the Seniors and Boomers’ Guide to Health Care Reform and Avoiding Nursing home Poverty.

Seniors, boomers, guide, poverty, nursing home,

Everyone would love 401(k) plans to look more like traditional pensions or Social Security, so savers can put less focus on the balance in their account rather than on the income it will eventually produce. That's an outlook your 100-year-old self may well appreciate.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we provide a unique education and counseling process which uses a unique 19 Point Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Review to help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones, click here for more information. We provide clients with a unique approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Elder Law, annuity, Baby Boomers, family, elder care, assisted living, elder care journey, assets, care, Elder Law, senior, insurance, surviving spouse, family

Estate and Long Term Care Planning for Women

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Mon, Aug 18, 2014

 

The Unique Challenges in Women Face with Estate Planning

Estate planning for women

Estate and Long Term Care Planning for Women can be different and full of confusing choices. Women are living longer today than ever before, and you will need an estate plan that can protect you from the new challenges arising daily. Let’s look at some of the more common situations below:

Married women tend to be younger than their husbands and tend to be on their own once their husband passes. Many married women let their husbands do all the financial planning, including their estate planning. Unfortunately this leaves many of them confused, or even blindsided by the oncoming costs that can appear with their estate and long term care options. Second marriages can create a whole new set of issues to deal with as well. Children from both marriages must be accounted for and must know what their responsibilities are going to be as well as fairly dividing their inheritance. For your own sake it would be best if you chose exactly who you would want to have power of attorney as well as whom you wish to have as your healthcare proxy. It is also important to update these documents regularly as many institutions do not accept them if they are more than a year old.

Single or childless women may choose to leave their possessions to close friends, relatives or charities. Without a good, up-to-date estate plan however, that won’t happen. Instead a bureaucrat appointed by the state will decide where your worldly goods will go when you’re gone. And for women living with a partner whom they are not legally married to, their partner won’t see one red cent of your estate unless you have an ironclad estate plan stipulating who gets what.

Your documents cannot do you much good unless they have been updated to reflect your current needs and situation. If you have gone through a separation or divorce you probably do not wish for your former partner to inherit your things or be making medical decisions about you. We have seen many cases where this has happened, and it is too late to change anything. Fortunately situations like this can be avoided by simply updating your documents regularly. At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center of Dennis Sullivan & Associates we provide clients with a unique Lifetime Protection Program to help keep their documents and plans up to date with any changes in their personal, family and health situations.

You must also consider what will happen if you require long term care and make sure there is going to adequate funding for what you may need in the future. Many people have made the mistake of giving away their savings in order to qualify for Medicaid without consulting a professional first. Not only was this unnecessary, they often still do not qualify because they did not plan for their situation ahead of time. Giving away their assets can even create large penalties if you ever need a nursing home. To learn more about some of the other mistakes to watch out for take a look at The Ten Biggest Estate and Asset Protection Mistakes People Make and How to Avoid Them! For a free report based on the book click here.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: health care proxy, Estate Planning, Elder Law, asset protection, long term care, Charitable Giving, Nursing Homes, marriage, Beneficiary, elder care, assisted living, estate, assets, coverage, death benefit, surviving spouse, Estate Planning Recommendations

Can Your Will Protect You When You Don't Die?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Thu, Aug 07, 2014

 

What Happens When You Don’t Die?

medicare, medicaid, wills, spouse

 

Is your “I love you” will capable of protecting you or your spouse from long-term care costs?

You know the kinds of wills we’re talking about: The husband leaves everything to the wife, the wife leaves everything to the husband and after they both die, everything goes to the kids. This works well in situations where the spouses are healthy one day and are deceased the next. 

However, as most of us know, life usually doesn’t work that way very often. Research indicates that nearly 70% of individuals over 65 will require some kind of long-term care in their lifetimes.

Thus, many spouses worry that if they predecease an ill spouse who is currently in a nursing home or will require long-term care at some point in the near future, there will be insufficient funds available to provide for their institutionalized spouses’ needs. This is an especially relevant concern for expenses that are not covered under Medicaid such as: care managers, private nurses, single rooms, as well as certain therapies and drugs.

Another concern is that the availability of funds from “I love you” wills and trusts will disqualify the surviving ill spouse from eligibility for Medicare benefits. As you know from prior articles, Medicare (MassHealth in Massachusetts) is the only long-term-care governmental program in the United States and does not cover long-term custodial care.

To solve this problem many of our clients rely on a “testamentary trust”. This is a trust built into the will of each spouse. For many estate planners, this is counterintuitive because much of the estate planning occurs within the context of a revocable living trust. In order to preserve access to Medicaid eligibility without requiring that the surviving spouse spend down the assets and lose the chance to maintain a “rainy day fund”, creating a testamentary trust in the will of the pre-deceasing spouse is essential.

What this means is that around age 55, you have to completely revise your wills and trusts to accommodate a different paradigm of thought. The thinking process is no longer “What happens when I die?” Now the question becomes “What happens if I don’t die and live a long time with expensive long-term care?”

The new paradigm requires a new estate plan. If you consider yourself middle-class (meaning that your net worth will be significantly impacted by the cost of long-term care for you and/or your spouse) and are over age 55, we suggest that you revise and update your estate plan to reflect your current and future needs as soon as possible.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

 Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: will, living will, Estate Planning, Estate Planning, Alzheimer's Disease, Elder Law, asset protection, long term care, Medicaid, in-home care, Health Care, estate reduction, estate, elder care journey, hospice, Alzheimers Disease, medicaid qualification, Wills, assets, Medicaid penalties, alzheimer's activities, in home, incapacity, Elder Law, Attorney, myths, Alzheimer's, alzheimers, financial, Attorney, income, Alzheimer's, federal, health, surviving spouse, in-home care, long term care insurance

Medicaid is No Walk in the Park Part 2|Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Nov 20, 2013

Medicaid is No Walk in the Park 

Part II

Walk in the Park

 Last time we were examining Kate’s problem getting Medicaid for her mom.  Specifically, the issue was a joint account held by mother and daughter.

Into that account, Kate deposited her income which she used to pay for household bills, such as utilities, real estate taxes, homeowner’s insurance etc.  She took some of Mom’s income and transferred it to that joint account in order to pay some of those bills.  She explained that both of them were living in the household so they both contributed to the costs.

“Not a problem”, I told Kate.  “But, if you are claiming that the account isn’t Mom’s, you have the burden of proving that.  Medicaid assumes that it was Mom’s account and she put your name on it, not the other way around.  You must trace that account back to when it was just in your name, before you added Mom as a co-owner.  Only then will Medicaid be satisfied that it isn’t Mom’s.”

Kate listened carefully.  “So, is that it”, she asked.   No, actually there was more.

If we are successful in showing Medicaid that it isn’t Mom’s account, then the transfer of Mom’s income to that account to help pay the bills would now be a transfer for less than fair value.  Why is that?  Because Mom is transferring money out of her name to an account that we have just proved is Kate’s, not Mom’s.

Isn‘t  Kate then caught up in a classic Catch-22?  She seems to lose either way. Well, no.  Not really.  There is a way out.  Remember, the money transferred to the joint account is Mom’s share of the household expenses.  As long as we are able to prove by a clear paper trail what that money was spent on, then Medicaid won’t assess a penalty.

I asked Kate if she is able to do all that.  She was hesitant to reply.  She told me she hadn’t kept detailed records with the expectation that she would need to prove all this to anyone.  But, she said she would do her best.

“As long as we can back up what you are saying with a clean paper trail”, I told Kate, “then we should be able to straighten out your Medicaid denial.”  Kate certainly had plenty of motivation to get to work.  The$ 40,000 nursing home bill that Mom owes would motivate just about anyone.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: asset protection, Medicaid, MassHealth, medicaid qualification, assets, Medicaid penalties, asset, 2013

Medicaid is no Walk in the Park |Boston Elder Law Attorney

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Mon, Nov 18, 2013

Medicaid Is No Walk In The Park

Walking in the Park, Thinking

Kate told me, “Mom has no money.  She’s never had any money.  But Medicaid still denied her application and now I owe the nursing home $40,000.”  I knew there had to be more to her story.  Sure enough, there was.

It’s a very common belief that, because Mom and Dad never had much money, the Medicaid application process should be a piece of cake.  Maybe it should be but the reality is it just isn’t the case. Kate’s dilemma was proof.

Kate told me that she and her Mom had lived together her entire life.  In fact, Mom and Dad transferred the home to Kate.  When I heard that, I immediately thought this could be her problem right there.

I asked how long ago the deed had been transferred.   “10 years ago”, was Kate’s reply.  That was clearly outside the 5 year Medicaid look back period so could not have triggered a Medicaid transfer penalty.    It had to be something else.

“Does Mom have any accounts with her name on it, that, in your mind, you don’t consider hers”, I asked.  That’s when Kate told me that she had a joint account with Mom but she insisted the money in that account was all hers, not Kate’s.

I learned that Kate’s income is deposited into that account, from which she pays the bills.  Mom’s income, she told me, goes into a separate account in Mom’s name, the only account Kate considers to be owned by Mom.  I explained to her that this was mostly likely the cause of her Medicaid denial.

Next time I’ll share with you why and what we could do to fix the problem.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: asset protection, Medicaid, MassHealth, medicaid qualification, assets, Medicare, asset, 2013

Massachusetts Estate Planning Tips | 3 Estate Planning New Year's Resolutions

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Thu, Jan 10, 2013

The New Year is filled with resolutions: lose weight, save money or plan a vacation, but in the thick of things it is easy to forget about planning ahead as you get a little older.

In this article, we review 3 Estate Planning Resolutions that should be part of everyone's 2013.

You Could Lose Everything  Unless You Act Now

1. Review your beneficiary designations.

While the terms of your Will control the distribution
of your probate property, beneficiary designations determine who will inherit your non-probate
assets. Non-probate assets include brokerage or bank accounts with TOD (“Transfer on Death”) or POD (“Payable on Death”) beneficiaries, life insurance proceeds, assets held in a living trust, property held in joint tenancy with a right of survivorship, etc. The beneficiary designations on these assets are just as important to your estate plan as the naming of beneficiaries in your Will because these beneficiaries will also inherit from your estate.

estate plan, 2013, new year

To conduct your review, identify the beneficiaries you have designated for each asset. If you have married, divorced, had children, or experienced any other significant change in family circumstances, you may wish to alter certain designations. If your current designations leave property outright to a minor or an individual with special needs, you may want to consider protecting those assets for your beneficiaries.  For more information on protecting your beneficiaries' inheritances, call our office at (781) 237-2815.

2. Plan for the disposition of your digital assets.

Sure, you know who will inherit your house and your IRA after you are gone, but what will happen to your emails? The tax records stored on your hard drive? Your Facebook page? The family photos in your Flickr galleries?

If your estate plan fails to address these and other digital assets, your loved ones may have trouble accessing financial accounts or lose precious family memories. Furthermore, failing to close online financial accounts may even expose your estate to the risk of identity theft.

Start by making an inventory of your digital assets then give your loved ones or executor instructions regarding what you would like to happen to each asset. For example, are any of your bills on auto-pay? Should your Facebook page be taken down?

3. Schedule a review of your estate plan.

Generally speaking, it is a good idea to review your estate plan every year. This is particularly
important if you have recently experienced a significant change in circumstances, such as a birth or death in the family, a marriage or divorce, or a change in financial circumstances.

As we move into 2013, it is critically important to schedule a time to have your estate plan reviewed by our team of professionals, to be sure that your spouse, home and life savings will be protected.

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops. Call 800-964-4295 to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your beneficiaries, digital assests, Estate Plan and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Estate Planning, Beneficiary, revocable living trust, assets, benefit, 2013, plans, New Year's Resolutions

Warning: Congressional Budget Office Considering Medicaid Changes That Will Cost You Hundreds of Thousands in Long Term Care Costs

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Fri, Jan 04, 2013

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) is reviewing a new proposal to increase the look back period for Medicaid from 5 years to 10 years.  This would mean that you may end up paying more from your savings if you need nursing home care.  The CBO is also reviewing the impact of decreasing the home equity exemption from $750,000 to $50,000, which means your home will be at risk if you or your spouse go to a nursing home.  It is more important than ever that you take the important steps now to protect your spouse, home and life savings before it's too late.  You can protect your home and life savings by taking action now, before these new rule changes take effect.  If you do not, you could end up costing your family its life savings. 

For more information attend one of our Trust, Estate & Asset Protection Workshops by calling (800) 964-4295 (24/7) or visiting www.SeniorWorkshop.com.


You can also download a new report on the Biggest Mistakes in Estate & Asset Protection Planning...and How to Avoid Them by clicking here.  The report covers how you and your loved ones can avoid costly mistakes in this post-fiscal cliff enconomy. 

Tags: trusts, Elder Law, asset protection, long term care, Nursing Homes, assisted living, assets, alzheimer's activities, Attorney

Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney | How Does MassHealth Treat the Home?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Jan 02, 2013

The home is very often the biggest single asset our clients own and in some cases the only asset.  Many of the MassHealth rules apply specifically to the home that don’t apply to any other asset so it is a focal point of our guidance as elder law attorneys.  Additionally, the home is treated differently from a tax standpoint (capital gains and estate tax) so we must consider taxes when advising our clients on the best course of action.Medicaid, Medicare, MassHealth

Many people tend to initiate a “do it yourself” strategy in trying to protect the home by transferring it to a child or selling it “for $1”.  This strategy is dangerous on a number of levels.  There isn’t a one size fits all solution, which is to say it isn’t always the right choice or always the wrong one.  The answer is “it depends”.  Many wrongfully assume that a transfer is “OK” because the home is an exempt asset under MassHealth rules but even a transfer of an exempt asset is subject to a MassHealth penalty.

seniors, health care, Medicare, Medicaid

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) is reviewing a new proposal to increase the look back period for Medicaid from 5 years to 10 years.  This would mean that you may end up paying more from your savings if you need nursing home care.  The CBO is also reviewing the impact of decreasing the home equity exemption from $750,000 to $50,000, which means your home could be lost if you or your spouse go to a nursing home.  It is more important than ever that you take the important steps now to protect your spouse, home and life savings before it's too late.  You can protect your home and life savings by taking action now, before these new rule changes take effect.  If you do not, you could end up costing your family its life savings.

Click here to get a free sneak preview of the “Senior and Boomer’s Guide to Health Care Reform & Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty”, which contains information on how Massachusetts Seniors and Boomers will be impacted by the Affordable Care Act!

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center of Dennis Sullivan & Associates, we help people and their families concerned with losing their homes and life savings to increasing medical and nursing home costs, taxes and the costs and time delays of probate. We also protect clients from losing control of their own health and financial decisions.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops to learn more about our process and what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy. To register for a seat at an upcoming workshop call (800) 964-4295 (24/7) or register online at www.SeniorWorkshop.com

Seniors, Attorney, Elder Law, Estate Planning

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Estate Planning, Elder Law, MassHealth, family, Massachusetts, assets, home

Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney | How Does Massachusetts Medicaid Treat a Married Couple's Assets?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Nov 28, 2012

How Does Massachusetts Medicaid Treat a Married Couple's Assets?

Medicaid combines both spouses’ assets together in determining eligibility.  The healthy or community spouse is allowed to keep a portion of the countable assets after the couple spends down for Medicaid eligibility. This division of assets is known as the Community Spouse Resource Allowance (CSRA) and the maximum amount in 2012 is $113,640.

The CSRA is calculated as follows:  Medicaid considers all countable assets as of the “first moment of the first day of the month of the current period of institutionalization”  of the Medicaid applicant (known as the “snapshot date”).   This is typically going to be the first day of the month that the applicant entered a Medicaid certified nursing facility, an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded, a licensed special hospital, or a psychiatric hospital.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center of Dennis Sullivan & Associates, we help people and their families concerned with losing their homes and life savings to increasing medical and nursing home costs, taxes and the costs and time delays of probate. We also protect clients from losing control of their own health and financial decisions.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops to learn more about our process and what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

During our workshop, we will also focus on a review of the top mistakes of Medicaid planning and how to plan to prevent and remedy them.

To register for a seat at an upcoming workshop call (800) 964-4295 (24/7) or register online at www.SeniorWorkshop.com

workshop, Medicaid

Tags: Medicaid, Massachusetts, assets, Elder Law, Attorney, asset

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