Massachusetts Estate Planning & Asset Protection Blog

THE RETIREMENT CHECKLIST EVERY BABY BOOMER NEEDS

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Mon, Sep 16, 2019

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Did you know that an income and expense retirement checklist is considered vital? This is because, typically, there are no “do-overs” when it comes to your retirement. For example, it may be difficult to regain your present income after age 50 by switching employers or to then regain the value of your collapsed portfolio. 

Accordingly, it is important to begin planning for retirement as soon as possible regardless of your age. Once you have started planning, we encourage you to revisit your retirement checklist at least every year to make any necessary adjustments. This includes budgeting for a catastrophic change in your spouse’s or a child’s health condition giving rise to the cost of long-term care expenses.  

Presently, you may live on a fixed budget whereby your monthly expenses do not exceed your current income. It is advisable that you take your present budget and make it into a retirement budget by simply projecting the income that may decline and the expenses that could increase in the year you plan to retire. It is also important to budget for future projected expenses that you do not presently incur. 

How do you plan forward for this occurrence? At the top of your retirement checklist, you need to think about your budget. In addition to your regular monthly budget, let us share a few items you need on your retirement checklist as you consider your future retirement expenses.

  1. Tax Withholding. What will be your net annual retirement income and your annual net required minimum distribution from your IRA’s or other retirement income? It is important that you remember that 20% of your annual retirement income will be withheld for taxes by your plan administrator. Your experienced estate planning attorney can help you determine the withholding or required minimum distribution. You may also want to learn more in our report, Using Individual Retirement Accounts for Estate Planning.
  2. Long-Term Care Expenses. Unfortunately, the cost of nursing home or assisted-living expenses can potentially deplete all of your savings. Long-term care insurance can pay for and help eliminate this financial catastrophe. However, not all long-term insurance policies are alike. It is important that your attorney study the terms of this policy with you to insure that you and your spouse receive the best coverage for what you can afford. You can learn more about your insurance policies and how to best prepare for long-term care in our report, How to Set the Stage for Your Medicaid Eligibility. 
  3. Children’s Expenses During Your Retirement. Do your children reside in another state? If so, they may incur considerable travel and lodging expenses as they attend to your personal care needs on what could be many trips to your home. Likewise, do you intend for your children to expend their personal funds for the actual cost and for their families’ travel to you and your spouse’s burial and cremation services? It is important that your attorney advise you as to his or her experience as to these costs. Your attorney can also help you determine the best method for your escrowing these costs from your savings account that you have earmarked “In Trust For” or “Paid on Death” for your child’s out-of-pocket costs or reimbursement of these family expenses. 

We know this article may raise more questions than it answers for you. If you have specific questions, do not wait to contact us. This only starts our discussion on how to prepare for retirement as a Baby Boomer. We encourage to take the time to review each of our critical guides with the information you need on this as well. Let us answer your questions about your unique retirement needs. 

If you would like more information on Elder Law, Medicare, the Affordable Care Act, or the impact of new health care laws on your health care coverage, request your free preview of our guide, the Senior & Boomers’ Guide to Health Care Reform & Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty.  

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy. By attending our workshop, you will also be entitle to more than $900 in valuable benefits, including your choice of books, DVDs and more! Call 800-964-4295 (24/7)

Tags: Retirement, Estate Planning, retirement plans

ESTATE PLANNING AND NURSING HOME PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS WHEN YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING RETIREMENT

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Sun, Sep 15, 2019

When it comes to your retirement, there are a number of important steps to take and questions to consider to help ensure that you can retire comfortably. For example, when was the last time you reviewed your estate plan and determined whether it still conforms to your goals and needs? Have you thought about your long-term care plans?

Older Americans are living longer now than ever before. As a result, people are finding themselves unprepared for the next stage of their life, both emotionally and financially. To help ease some of your worries, let us share with you a few estate planning and nursing home planning considerations when you are contemplating retirement.

Estate Planning

When contemplating retirement, do you have the answers to the following questions? What will you do in a crisis?

Have you named a decision maker who is able to act for you? It is important to ensure that your agent under your durable power of attorney not only has the ability to make long-term care decisions for you but can also engage in the planning you may need.

One of the primary benefits of setting up an estate plan is the privacy and protection for your assets it provides. Unfortunately, if you pass without leaving any planning

protections in place, your estate will be subject to probate proceedings. As a result, information about your assets will be considered a matter of public record and anyone who would like access to that information can easily obtain it.

Long-Term Care

Did you know that research tells us that only around thirteen percent of all seniors are prepared for a future that could include the need for long-term care outside the home? We cannot stress enough the importance of planning ahead and learning about your options early. Research what long-term care costs in your community, talk to your primary care physician about your future, and discuss your plans with your family.

Further, once you have your goals in mind, talk to your experienced elder law attorney. He or she can help you create a plan that meets your needs. This can be accomplished long before you require long-term care. As a result, you will have access to many more planning options that best fit your needs. We know that preparing for the next stage of your life can be overwhelming. Remember, we are here to help guide you through each step and can help you evaluate the best

planning options for you and your family. If you are ready to discuss your planning needs, do not wait to contact our office.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy. By attending our workshop, you will also be entitle to more than $900 in valuable benefits, including your choice of books, DVDs and more! Call 800-964-4295 (24/7)

Tags: Retirement, Estate Planning, retirement plans

5 Questions to Ask When Updating Your Estate Plan in the New Year 2019

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Mon, Jan 07, 2019

P42.Sullivan.Blog.Dec1Creating a personalized estate plan may be the single most important thing you can do to make sure your decisions are honored if you become incapacitated or when you pass away. If you do not have an estate plan right now, or it has been years since you reviewed it, the new year may be the right time to ensure you are able to protect yourself and those you love most.

Much of estate planning deals with protecting and distributing property. A Last Will and Testament, for example, provides instructions for how a deceased person’s possessions should be distributed. Similarly, a Revocable Trust can direct the distribution of assets upon one’s death, although it can also manage the creator’s assets while he or she is alive.

There is much more to estate planning than Wills and Trusts, however, and your estate planning attorney can provide plenty of guidance. Let us share five questions to ask not only when you are considering crafting an estate plan but if you are updating an existing plan in the new year.

 

  1. Did you move to a different state? Every state has its own laws governing estate planning. Some features in an existing plan will be unaffected, while some key items may need to be revised. Do not wait to review with an estate planning attorney in your new state to ensure your plans can be fulfilled as you originally wanted them to be.

 

  1. Do any of your beneficiaries have special needs? If a special needs loved one is named in your estate plan, then it is worth exploring ways of specifically providing for them, especially after you are gone. Unfortunately, without planning that contemplates the needs of your disabled loved one, he or she may be at risk of losing valuable government benefits.

 

  1. Do you need to update a power of attorney? A power of attorney document gives someone else the legal authority to make decisions on your behalf. The document can be tailored to meet your specific needs, or provide for general decision making authority. Talk to your attorney to ensure there is a durability provision to cover the possibility of your incapacitation.

 

  1. Have you considered advanced healthcare directives? Advanced healthcare directives, including tools such as the living will, are legal documents in which a person specifies what actions are to be taken regarding his or her health if he or she is no longer able to make decisions. You may want to review any existing plans to ensure you have the right person named to make your healthcare decisions.

 

  1. Do you want to change beneficiaries? A marriage, a death in the family, a divorce, or the birth of new child or grandchild, are only a few reasons to update beneficiary designations in estate planning documents. You may also want to add a charity or a cause you care about. The new year is a great time to do so.

 Do not wait to think about the estate planning you need to protect yourself and your loved ones. Although the new year can be a great time to get things in order, remember, there is never a “wrong” time to ensure you have the planning you need. Do not wait to contact us with your questions and to schedule your attendance at one of our free Trust, Estate and Asset Protection Workshops.

Tags: asset protection, long term care, Retirement, Estate Planning, Baby Boomers, Elder Law, HIPAA, durable power of attorney, Health Care, health care proxy, seniors, estate tax, family, New Year's Resolutions, Estate Planning Tip, 2019

Understanding Long Term Care Planning

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Fri, Jan 19, 2018

Facing the enormity of long term care, whether it is the financial, healthcare, emotional or psychological issues, it is so overwhelming. 

It's needs a team effort!  With the help of family, friends and our team here at Dennis Sullivan and Associates you can make the enormity of long term care manageable 

 

What exactly is "Long Term Care Planning" ? 

Here's one way to look at long term care planning: 

In today’s world, the question is no longer only, “What happens when I die?, but now we need to plan for “What happens if I live?” An estate plan covers the scenario of, What happens when I die.  But long term care covers a large variety of other factors and scenarios that sometime families forget to consider such as what happens if I live but am not healthy and have increased health-care costs and need to rely on others for assistance, either temporarily or on a permanent basis. The estate plan does not address this need. An estate plan can help you answer the first question, but a long-term care plan can help you answer both the first and second questions. Let’s put it another way. An estate plan insures that if you have assets when you die they will be passed in the manner you wish. The key word is “if.” The plan will not, however, guarantee that there will be anything left at that time to pass. Your assets could be mostly or entirely wiped out by a lengthy illness, hospital, and/or nursing home stay, leaving your spouse and other heirs with nothing.

 long Term Care and Medicaid:

I had a conversation last week with a married couple for whom we are preparing a Medicaid application. John is in a nursing home, and Mary is healthy and living at home. I explained to them that Mary can keep half of their countable assets, in their case $75,000, but that they must spend down to below that dollar amount by the last day of the month directly preceding the month we want to qualify John for Medicaid. I have had this conversation numerous times with clients in John and Mary’s situation, and know all too well that this simple instruction is not always followed. The largest part of most spend downs typically goes to the nursing home. But, as most people do, myself included, we wait until we get a bill before we pay it. If I owe you money, I’m not going to chase after you for a bill. Whenever you get around to it and invoice me, then I’ll pay it. The longer the money stays in my bank account, the happier I am. However, this can get you into big trouble and cost you tens of thousands of dollars if you wait for the nursing home bill. If we want John to be eligible for Medicaid next month and we know that he owes the nursing home $20,000 for the past two months of care, but the nursing home hasn’t yet presented Mary with a bill, it does not matter that Mary and John legitimately owe the facility the money. If that $20,000 is still sitting in their bank account next month, causing their account balance to exceed $75,000, John cannot qualify for Medicaid. Even worse than that, he can’t even qualify for next month. He has to wait until the following month, which means they will owe the facility another $10,000, leaving Mary with $65,000 to live on.


So Much to Discuss

For more information on Long Term Care Planning we encourage you attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy. January sessions are filling up fast call or register on line to reserve your seat today.  

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future. 


Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Retirement, Estate Planning, Baby Boomers, Elder Law, Attorney, GST tax, Massacusetts Estate Tax, Financial Planning, taxes, coverage, tax liability, tax exemption, Tax Savings, tax deductions, tax reform, New estate tax law, IRS, federal, Estate Planning Tip, Massachusetts, senior, Estate Planning Recommendations, Dennis Sullivan, tax, Capital Gains Tax, new regulations, New Tax Bill, Tax Bill, 2018 Tax Bill

New Tax Bill: What you need to know

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Fri, Jan 05, 2018

How does the new tax bill affect you and your family now and in the future?

The new tax bill has officially been passed by Congress and signed by President Trump, what does this mean for us?  The answer to this depends on many variables discussed here. 

 

First of all, these changes don’t apply until you file your 2018 taxes, meaning that you won’t have to worry about the new law when filing your 2017 income tax returns this spring.  That being said, still we will be experiencing the greatest overhaul of the tax laws in more than 30 years.  The last major changes having been made under President Reagan in 1986. 

One change you can expect to see is that both corporate tax rates and personal income tax rates will drop.  There are also other changes which limit or eliminate personal deductions.   The changes that affect corporate tax rates are permanent, and the changes that affect individual tax rates and deductions are not.

Also in the new tax bill you will find a “sunset” provision, meaning that the new law – as it applies to individuals – will expire on December 31, 2025.   That is, unless Congress agrees to extend the law.  That, of course, will depend on the political and economic climate 8 years from now, including whether the economy responds the way Republicans say it will

       Now let’s take a look at the changes that are likely to affect the average senior.  Good news, the tax rates have been lowered a bit.  There are still 7 tax brackets but the rates have changed with the top rate lowered from 39.6% to 37% and the threshold at which each rate is reached has been altered. (The corporate rate reduction is much greater, from 37% to 21%).

       Some of the most significant changes relate to deductions.  The standard deduction has been doubled to $12,000 for a single person and $24,000 for married couples but personal exemptions have been eliminated.  The deduction for state and local taxes will be capped at $10,000, something that could hurt many Massachusetts residents and especially homeowners because we have high real estate and state income taxes.  


So Much to Discuss:

For the first time in decades major overhauls to the tax system are happening! This is an enormous change that can affect your estate planning and asset protection as well. Be sure to stay tuned as we will discuss more about this new tax bill in our next blog post!    

For more information we encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy. January sessions are filling up fast call or register on line to reserve your seat today.  

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future. 


Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Retirement, Estate Planning, Baby Boomers, Elder Law, Attorney, GST tax, Massacusetts Estate Tax, Financial Planning, taxes, coverage, tax liability, tax exemption, Tax Savings, tax deductions, tax reform, New estate tax law, IRS, federal, Estate Planning Tip, Massachusetts, senior, Estate Planning Recommendations, Dennis Sullivan, tax, Capital Gains Tax, new regulations, New Tax Bill, Tax Bill, 2018 Tax Bill

Is your Planning Stuck in Limbo? (part 2)

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Tue, Aug 01, 2017

How does the debate over health care reform affect you and your estate plan?

35274856603_c2af85ca10_b.jpg In our last post we discussed the importance of keeping up with the constant changes happening in health care reform. We will continue to examine how the on-going deliberations in Washington may affect you, your future health care and your estate.  We at Dennis Sullivan & Associates are keeping up to date on all the changes, and making sure you stay informed on all the important details.  For more information on the current law of the land, you can download our Report: Senior & Boomers Guide to Health Care Reform.   

The Senate has dealt a devastating setback to Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare, defeating a GOP "skinny repeal" bill early Friday morning. With the "skinny repeal" bill off the table, lawmakers are unsure of where the health care debate is headed. 

Senate Majority Leader McConnell and his staff are trying to find a balance between conservative Republicans, who want a full repeal of ObamaCare and a replacement that has lower health care costs, and more moderate Republicans who want to preserve its more popular benefits.

The deal-making process is in full swing, with the additions of opioid funding and allowing health savings accounts to be used to pay for insurance premiums. Some Senators are for potentially leaving in some taxes to pay for more generous benefits, after weeks of being criticized by Democrats for offering “tax cuts for the rich and Medicaid cuts for the poor.” Conservatives want to cut more from the regulations and many from Medicaid expansion states are uneasy about future cuts to Medicaid.

Senator Ted Cruz of Texas has offered an amendment called the “Consumer Freedom Option” that would allow insurance companies to sell any health coverage plan they wish as long as they provide one plan that satisfies the “essential benefits” mandates of Obamacare. While the Cruz amendment appeals to conservatives who want to provide consumers with lower cost options, moderates are concerned it could negatively impact those with pre-existing conditions. Supporters have suggested that federal subsidies could help ensure that premiums don’t increase for those who are seriously ill. The CBO is currently scoring this amendment.  

President Trump, along with Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky and Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska, has even offered to repeal ObamaCare for now and replace it later.

Of course, no one is going to get everything they want so there must be compromises. Majority Leader McConnell has said that if the Senate is not able to pass a bill soon, Congress will have to pass a bipartisan measure to shore up the imploding health insurance markets.

And so, the Civics lesson continues. The process is at work.  As we see here the process can be long, unstable and worrisome.  Luckily for you your estate planning doesn’t have be. We at Dennis Sullivan and Associates make your estate planning and asset protection worry and stress free.  Once you have a plan in place you will feel confident knowing it will protect you, your family and your life savings.  You can enjoy life to the fullest knowing you and your family are protected no matter what unknowns lay ahead. 

 

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: long term care, Medicare, Medicaid, life-care plan, Retirement, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Announcements, elder care journey, Health Care, seniors, elder care, health Care act, Financial Planning, enrollment, Affordable Health Care Act, coverage, coverages, medical expenses, unreimbured medical expenses, Medicaid penalties, Health Care Ruling, federal, Affordable Health Care, Obamacare, senior, medicaid qualification, health, care, disenrollment, proposed changes, care costs, applying for medicare

Is your Planning Stuck in Limbo?

Posted by Dennis Sullivan & Associates on Thu, Jul 27, 2017

How does the debate over Health Care Reform affect you and your estate plan?

Everyone is talking about health care reform: whether it’s the House bill, Repeal & Replace, Skinny Repeal, it can make your head spin.  One question on everyone’s mind is how changes to health care will affect them.  We at Dennis Sullivan & Associates are keeping up to date on all the changes, and will cover the process through a series of blogs to explain where health care reform is now, how it affects you and what the future may hold.  For more information on the current law of the land, you can download our Report: Senior & Boomers Guide to Health Care Reform

 


Senate pic-1.jpg

Eventually, both the House and Senate must vote on the same bill.

The battle continues in Washington over the repeal or replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) and as we are witnessing; this can be a messy process. 

Why Republicans are trying so hard to repeal and replace ObamaCare and how they are going about it:

ObamaCare, you may remember, was passed by the Democrats in 2010 with no Republican support. Ever since, Republicans have campaigned on repealing the program, which was unpopular with many Americans. “Repeal and Replace” was their rallying cry to voters to help them win back control of the House in 2012, then the Senate in 2014, and finally the Presidency in 2016. If the Republicans are not able to fulfill this major promise, some may be in danger of losing their seats in the next election, as they would likely be blamed for the problems with ObamaCare if they don’t fix them. These are the political reasons.

Democrats admit that ObamaCare has problems and needs a major fix to survive. But they are not on board with repeal and replace of such a signature piece of legislation, while Republicans try to find a way to pass new legislation.

The Legislative process:

The normal legislative process is that a bill begins in the House, where it is written, discussed and approved by a committee before the House votes on it. If it passes the House, it is then sent to the Senate. The Senate can vote on the same bill, make amendments to the House bill, or create its own bill. Eventually, both the House and Senate must vote on the same bill, so if there are differences, members of both the House and Senate meet in committee to resolve them. Once a bill passes both the House and Senate, it is then sent to the President who can sign it into law or veto it.

Right now, there is a House bill on health care that has passed the House, and a Senate bill that has not passed the Senate. Discussions and amendments are still occurring with the Senate bill in hopes it will pass soon. The public posture is that this messy legislative process is making the bill better.

Further complicating this process is that while the Republicans have a majority in both the House and the Senate, they only have 52 Republican Senators. 60 votes are required to overcome the filibusters and pass new legislation, so they are attempting to pass health care legislation through the Budget Reconciliation process. It only requires 51 votes, but it limits the legislation to budget-related items only. They would not be able to include provisions some Republicans want in a full repeal and replace bill—for example, letting insurance companies sell across state lines to increase competition, lower prices and create better plans; and allowing the government to negotiate lower drug prices. Issues like these would have to be voted on later.

For the Senate bill to pass in Reconciliation, 50 Republicans must vote for the bill, since no Democrat or Independent is expected to vote for the bill. Vice-President Pence would break the tie if needed.

So far:

The Senate rejected a proposal from Republican lawmakers to repeal Obamacare on Wednesday July 26, 2017, marking a significant milestone in the Republican Party's years-long political crusade to gut former President Barack Obama's legacy health care law.

 

What does the future hold?

We aren’t sure what the future American Health Care Act is going to look like, not sure anyone does, but luckily protecting yourself and your loved ones from expensive long term care doesn’t have to be so uncertain.  With asset based long term care products, there are ways to insure your control over your future long term care and insure you have something left over for your spouse, children and loved ones. Don’t let your long term care plan sit in limbo. Stay tuned we will discuss more about what the future looks like in our next blog post.

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At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique educational and counseling so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

If you would like more information on Medicaid, the Affordable Care, or the impact of new health care laws on your planning, request your free preview of our guide, the Senior & Boomers’ Guide to Health Care Reform & Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty. 

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops, call 800-964-4295 and register to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your spouse, home, life savings and legacy.Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Medicare, Medicaid, Retirement, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Announcements, Health Care, elder care, Financial Planning, surviving spouse, Affordable Health Care Act, coverage, coverages, unreimbured medical expenses, Medicaid penalties, Health Care Ruling, Obama, Obamacare, Estate Planning Tip, senior, Estate Planning Recommendations, Dennis Sullivan, care costs, applying for medicare

Massachusetts Estate Planning Attorney | Naming the Right Beneficiary of Your Retirement Plan

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Feb 13, 2013

IRA, Retirment, Estate PlanningIRAs and other tax-deferred retirement accounts allow your savings to grow tax-free until you retire. At that point, typically the year after you become age 70 ½, you must begin taking required minimum distributions, on which you pay ordinary income taxes. The rest of the money in your account continues to grow tax-free until it is distributed to you. If you die before depleting your account, the balance of your account will go to the beneficiary you have named.

Naming the right beneficiary is critical. Most people want to continue the tax-deferred growth for as long as possible, paying the least amount in income taxes. This is called “stretching out” the account. Distributions after you die will be based on the new beneficiary’s age and life expectancy, so the younger the beneficiary (like a child or grandchild), the longer the stretch out potential.

However, naming a beneficiary outright has several disadvantages:

  • If the beneficiary is a minor, distributions will need to be paid to a guardian; if no guardian exists, one will have to be appointed by the court.

  • An older beneficiary can do whatever he/she wants with this money, including taking larger distributions or even cashing out the entire account and destroying your carefully made plans for long-term, tax-deferred growth

  • This money could be lost to the beneficiary’s creditors, spouse and ex-spouse(s).

  • There is the risk of court interference if your beneficiary becomes incapacitated.

  • Outright distributions could cause a beneficiary with special needs to lose valuable government benefits.

  • If your beneficiary is your spouse, he/she will be able to name a new beneficiary and is under no obligation to follow your wishes. This may not be what you want, especially if you have children from a previous marriage or you feel that your spouse may be too easily influenced by others after you are gone.

    •  Substantial amount of income taxes that would be due on a lump sum distribution.

Increased Control & Protection

Naming a trust as beneficiary will give you more control over, and protection for, these tax-deferred accounts. It should be a separate trust designed specifically for this purpose; because of the rules governing naming trusts as a beneficiary it should not be part of your revocable living trust or other trust. For this reason, these trusts are often called “stand-alone retirement trusts.”

Instead of required minimum distributions being paid directly to your beneficiary, they will be paid into the trust for the benefit of your beneficiary. The trust can either be mandated to pay these distributions directly to the beneficiary (called a conduit trust) or it can accumulate these distributions (called an accumulation trust) and pay out trust assets according to your instructions (for example, for higher education expenses, down payment on a home, etc.)

Specific benefits include:

  • No guardian is needed for minor children and there is no risk of court interference at the beneficiary’s incapacity. That’s because a trust, not the individual, is the named beneficiary.

  • Your beneficiary is prevented from cashing out or taking larger distributions, assuring the continuation of tax-deferred growth.

  • The account itself is protected from creditors and predators, even from divorce claims. However, if a conduit trust is used and distributions are required to be paid to the beneficiary, those distributions would be at risk. For maximum creditor protection, an accumulation trust is preferable.

  • You can name successor beneficiaries in the trust document and keep control over who will receive the proceeds if your initial beneficiary should die before the account is fully paid out.

  • An accumulation trust is typically used to provide for a beneficiary with special needs. Instead of the beneficiary receiving the required distributions as income (which could affect his/her ability to receive government benefits), the trustee can use discretion and provide for certain needs of the beneficiary as they arise, without jeopardizing their benefits.

In order to be accepted by the IRS, the trust must meet very specific requirements, and should be designed and written by an attorney who has experience in this area.

You’ve worked years to accumulate your tax-deferred plans. Naming the right beneficiary can preserve and continue the tax-deferred growth long after you’re gone, protect the assets from creditors and the courts, and provide for your loved ones the way you want.  

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique education and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops. Call 800-964-4295 to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your family and legacy.

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: Retirement, Estate Planning, family, 401(k), 529 plans, IRA, retirement plans

Massachusetts Elder Law Attorney | Want to Save Money on Long-Term Care? Get It Now!

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Feb 06, 2013

Whenever a client tells us they'll look into long-term care insurance "some day," ask yourself these questions: Am I a betting man (or woman)? And, if so...do I always bet against the odds?"describe the image

What we mean, is that by putting off long term care insurance, you are betting that medical costs won't go up and that long-term care insurance will be easier to get as you get older?  You are also betting that "some day" will arrive before you get sick.

A recent report revealed that the closer people get to retirement, the more frightened they become about meeting long-term care costs.  These fears impact women even more than men. And there's good reason for that. Women generally have greater long-term care needs, as they live longer, and are less likely to have a partner to care for them.  In fact, Genworth Financial, the largest long-term insurer in America, is talking about raising rates for women.

There are a few possibilities to address some long-term care costs, among them Medicare and hybrid plans, which might have riders with life insurance or annuities.

But there's only one way to get the best price: GET IT NOW!  Can you name even one item for which you pay less now than you did a few years ago?  As a general insurance principal, the older you get, the higher the premium. So, if you can pull it off now, you'll thank yourself later.

If you're betting that "someday" will come before you get sick...are you willing to bet every cent you've ever earned on it, because no insurance company will accept you after you're sick!  

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique education and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops. Call 800-964-4295 to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your family and legacy.

workshop, estate planning, Massachusetts, attorney

Click Here to Register For Our Trust, Estate & Asset  Protection Workshop

Tags: long term care, Retirement, Elder Law, Attorney, Massachusettes, insurance, medical

Massachusetts Elder Law Lawyer | Considering Retirement or Retired?

Posted by Massachusetts Estate Planning & Elder Law Attorney, Dennis B. Sullivan, Esq., CPA, LLM on Wed, Jan 30, 2013

Now Is the Time to Review Your Investments

In conducting research for our upcoming book, the Senior & Boomer’s Guide to Health Care Reform & Avoiding Nursing Home Poverty we learned that many people who are still working are giving retirement a second thought.

This is because they have to make big decisions about things such as Social Security and taxes - in advance. The world as we knew it has been turned upside-down in recent years, and this decision will affect the rest of your life.  Many are not sure they are ready - emotionally and financially - to retire.

If you're considering making the break, ask yourself these questions:

AM I REALLY READY?

Because of the loss of our financial security-blankets in recent years, people are working longer. If you enjoy your job, maybe you should keep working.

Working will allow you more time to build up your savings for the day when you really do want to play golf instead of office politics, and more time to pay down your mortgage. Keep in mind, once you retire, it can be difficult to un-retire.

CAN I REALLY LIVE ON A SMALLER BUDGET?

If you think it was hard staying on a budget during your working life, you ain't seen nuthin' yet! In fact, it often gets more expensive to live after you retire. You've got less coming in. But you'll probably be spending money on things you never had the time to spend it on before.

You'll probably be traveling more. Seeing more movies or ballgames. Playing more golf. Going out with friends more. And perhaps buying more "toys."

The Web can be a resource.  Retirement and financial planning websites like Mint.com can help you figure out expenses that may end with retirement, and those that may begin.

Some experts encourage a trial run, by living on a projected "retirement budget" while you're still working. It's not a totally accurate method. But it might give you time to develop coping strategies.

CAN I PUT OFF TAKING SOCIAL SECURITY?

There's a natural instinct to sign up when you turn 62. But "full-retirement age" isn't until 66...and, if you start early, your benefits will be reduced. So, if you've got a bit of a nest egg, consider waiting a while. And if you can wait until 70, your benefits will be even higher.

For those eligible at age 66, waiting just one year will result in monthly benefits equaling 108% of the previous amount. And waiting until 70 would generate 132% of the regular monthly benefit!  In fact, you can nearly double the amount you'll get at 62 if you can wait until 70.

HAVE YOU SPOKEN WITH YOUR ACCOUNTANT?

Most of us speak with our accountant just once a year - at tax time. But don't consider retirement without discussing your finances with your accountant or asking us about how we can help you with retirement and tax planning.

Consider a financial planner, too. A big chunk of your IRA is going to Uncle Sam when you withdraw it.  Together, we can help you develop a strategy for your taxable and tax-sheltered accounts. And we can help you decide whether to convert to a Roth IRA, where withdrawals are tax-free, but conversions are not.

ARE YOUR INVESTMENTS SAFE AND PRODUCTIVE?

Many people especially those considering retirement or in retirement should review their portfolio with an eye towards age and risk tolerance, making sure they are in line with one and other.  Many people are sick of banks not only dropping their CD rates but their money market rates as well.  Many professionals are concerned that interest rates may be at a turning point and with the debt ceiling conversation being revisited, now may be a good time to review your investment options.  If you would like some information on safe investing for seniors, please let us know.

At the Estate Planning & Asset Protection Law Center, we help people and their families learn how to protect their home, spouse, life-savings, and legacy for their loved ones.  We provide clients with a unique education and counseling approach so they understand where opportunities exist to eliminate problems now as they implement plans for a protected future.

We encourage you to attend one of our free educational workshops. Call 800-964-4295 to learn more about what you can do to enhance the security of your family and legacy.

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Tags: Retirement, Estate Planning, Baby Boomers, Elder Law, Attorney, roth conversions, 401(k), income, senior, retirement plans

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